The New Go-To: PreludeEASE™ Resists Compression Better Than the Leading Competitor

At Merit Medical, we’re dedicated to using the most advanced materials, designs, and manufacturing techniques with the goal of delivering solutions you can always depend on. Our PreludeEASE™ Hydrophilic Sheath Introducer is a perfect example of this commitment. Designed for strength, data shows the PreludeEASE resists compression better than the leading competitor—making it the New Go-To sheath.1

Compression resistance is an essential factor when considering a new sheath. Case studies have shown that if an arterial spasm occurs during a procedure, it can lead to the sheath compressing into the catheter, entrapping it within the vessel, and making removal of the catheter from the sheath difficult.2

Some thin-walled sheaths can be prone to compression and kinking that could result in difficult catheter manipulation. In the event of radial spasm, the catheter and sheath may need to be removed. Using a product with robust sheath tubing, like the PreludeEASE, may help clinicians avoid this problem. When tested against the leading competitor, the PreludeEASE displayed excellent compression-resistance performance.1

Other PreludeEASE advanced features include a large inner diameter for easier transitions and increased device compatibility and hydrophilic coating to facilitate insertion and removal as well as patient comfort.3 Moving smoothly from wire to dilator and dilator to sheath, the PreludeEASE streamlined design requires up to 30% less insertion force in comparison to the leading competitor.1

To accommodate varying patient anatomy, the PreludeEASE is available in multiple size configurations that range from 4F-7F diameters and can be customized in kits and packs to include other tools you need to achieve radial success.

Explore the New Go-To PreludeEASE and all it has to offer by visiting the PreludeEASE product page or talk to a knowledgeable Merit representative today.

REFERENCES

  1. In-House Data
  2. Popma, J. (2013). Radial Artery Complication: Case Presentation. SCAI 2013. [PowerPoint slides].
  3. Kiemeneij, F., Fraser, D., Slagboom, T., et al. (2003). Hydrophilic coating aids radial sheath withdrawal and reduces patient discomfort following transradial coronary intervention: a randomized double-blind comparison of coated and uncoated sheaths. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv, Jun; 59(2): 161-164.